Welcome to the Nieh Lab

Learn more about the study of Animal Behavior at UCSD.

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Recent & Upcoming Events

Research seminar: (Fall 2017) Nieh JC. Seminar. Title to be announced. University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, USA.

Conference presentation: (Nov. 2017) James C & Nieh JC. The dose makes the poison: honest signaling and aggression in a robber stingless bee, Lestrimelitta niitkib. Entomological Society of America 2017 Conference. Denver, Colorado, USA.

Research seminar: (Oct 23, 2017) Nieh JC. Seminar. Cries in the colony: Honey bee functionally referential communication of danger. University of Arizona, Tuscon, Arizona, USA.

Research seminar: (July 2017) Evolution of referential communication in honey bees: new insights. Yunnan Agricultural Academy, Menzhi, China.

Research seminar: (July 6, 2017) The dose is the poison: evolution of alarm communication in highly social bees. Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming, Yunnan, China.

Research seminar: (July 4, 2017) Nieh JC. Effects of xenobiotics on the behavior and cognition of honey bees. Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Science, Xishuangbanna, China.

UC-Xavier Program 2018-2020: Summer research and graduate training opportunities at UCSD
We are excited to announce the funding of the UC-Xavier Program, a summer program for undergraduates attending Xavier University of Louisiana. Students can apply via the UCSD STARS program website. Each year, at least six students will be selected to work during the summer, all expenses paid, in labs within the Division of Biological Sciences and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UCSD. Students will also receive graduate prep training and present their research at the end of the summer.

outreach

The UC-Xavier program.

Predators such as Asian hornets have likely engaged in an evolutionary arms race with prey such Asian honey bees. The hornet are large and have exceptionally thick armor that bee stings penetrate with difficulty. Honey bees have evolved heat-balling, which takes advantage of their ability to recruit large number of nest defenders to swarm around the hornet and kill it with heat and elevated carbon dioxide levels. However, this is a costly defense, and, as such, one expects the evolution of warning signals. In fact, Asian bee species have evolved a fascinating wing flicking display, the "I See You" (ISY) signal that warns the hornet it has been detected. This type of warning is part of broad category of alarm signals found in many types of animals and part of what we studying in China. Why is the ISY signal effective? Is it truly an honest signal? Under certain circumstances, can "bluffing" be a useful strategy for animals like bees?

Lab news
Please note: The copyright of these articles (with the exception of Open Access articles) is with their respective publishers. By downloading an article, you agree to limit the use of the pdf file to printing of single copies for personal research and study. You may not modify the files in any way, or to use them for commercial purposes.

Ping Wen, Yanan Cheng, Yufeng Qu, Hongxia Zhang, Jianjun Li, Heather Bell, Ken Tan, and Nieh, J.C. (2017) Foragers of sympatric Asian honey bee species intercept competitor signals by avoiding benzyl acetate from Apis cerana alarm pheromone. Scientific Reports. DOI:10.1038/s41598-017-03806-6

outreach

(A) Native Asian honey bee species, Apis dorsata (Ad) and Apis cerana (Ac) foraging on a shared flower. (B) These species are attacked by common predators like ants and it turns out that they can benefit from each other's alarm pheromones, using them to mutually avoid dangerous foraging sites.


Lam, C., Li., Y., Landgraf, T., and Nieh, J.C. (2017) Dancing attraction: followers of honey bee tremble and waggle dances exhibit similar behaviors. Biology Open. 6: 810-817, doi:10.1242/bio.025445

outreach

(A) Honey bees communicate with multiple signals of which the waggle dance is perhaps the most famous. In this paper, we show that the receivers of these signals behave similarly when following waggle dances and tremble dances, a signal that occurs in multiple contexts and is related to the reallocation of colony labor.


Ping Wen, Yanan Cheng, Yufeng Qu, Hongxia Zhang, Jianjun Li, Heather Bell, Ken Tan, and Nieh, J.C. (2017) Foragers of sympatric Asian honey bee species intercept competitor signals by avoiding benzyl acetate from Apis cerana alarm pheromone. Scientific Reports. DOI:10.1038/s41598-017-03806-6

outreach

(A) Native Asian honey bee species, Apis dorsata (Ad) and Apis cerana (Ac) foraging on a shared flower. (B) These species are attacked by common predators like ants and it turns out that they can benefit from each other's alarm pheromones, using them to mutually avoid dangerous foraging sites.


Park, B. and Nieh, J.C. (2017) The pollen foraging ecology of honey bees (Apis mellifera) in a fragmented environment. Insectes Sociaux. DOI 10.1007/s00040-017-0565-8

outreach

The spatial distribution of bee-visited floral patches inferred from decoding waggle dances. (A) The location of all pollen foraging patches in the study area inferred from the waggle dance plotted onto a land-use map of the study site. White areas indicate developed urban areas. Green areas denote open habitat fragments. Locations of bee foraging patches decoded from waggle dances are denoted by red dots. Observation hives were housed at the location denoted by the orange star. (B) Density maps of bee-visited forage patches decoded from waggle dances for each season. Warmer colors denote a higher density of points at a 100 m 2 spatial resolution. Data was pooled from all colonies (location shown as red dot). This figure was published as Fig. 2 in Park and Nieh (2017).


Tosi, S., G. Burgio, and Nieh, J.C. (2017) Sublethal effects of a common neonicotinoid pesticide, thiamethoxam, on honey bee flight. Scientific Reports. DOI:10.1038/s41598-017-01361-8

Listen the Michigan Public Radio interview of Tosi et al. (2017) .

A press release for Tosi et al. (2017) is available. In addition, this file contains an archive of popular press news articles relevant to this paper.

The video below shows how we test honey bee flight

Tan, K., Dong, S., Liu, X., Wang, C., Li, J., and Nieh J.C. (2016) Honey bee inhibitory signaling is tuned to threat severity and can act as a colony alarm signal. PLOS Biology. 14(3): e1002423-19.

This paper was recenty featured by PLOS Biology in their Open Highlights section: A Swarm of Bee Research by Lauren A. Richardson.

The following news articles have been published in the media based upon Tan et al. (2016). Please download this zipped file for the pdf files.

Tan, K., Cheng, W., Dong, S., Liu, X., Wang, Y. and Nieh, J. C. (2015) A neonicotinoid impairs olfactory learning in Asian honey bees (Apis cerana) exposed as larvae or as adults. Scientific Reports. DOI:10.1038/srep10989.

The following news articles have been published in the media based upon Tan et al. (2015). Please download this zipped file for the pdf files.

Eiri, D., Endler, M., Suwannapong, G., and Nieh, J.C. (2015) Nosema ceranae can infect honey bee larvae and reduce subsequent adult longevity. PLOS One. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0126330.

For more information, please listen to a KPBS radio interview about this research at the KPBS website

The following news articles have been published in the media based upon Eiri et al. (2015). Please download this zipped file for the pdf files.

Lichtenberg, E., Graff Zivin, J., Hrncir, M. and Nieh, J. C. (2014) Eavesdropping selects for conspicuous signals. Current Biology. 24(1): R598-R599. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2014.05.062

The video below shows how stingless bees can fight for food sources. Fighting makes it costly for eavesdroppers trying to take over food (Lichtenberg et al. 2014).


The following news articles have been published in the media based upon Lichtenberg et al. (2014)

Entomology Today (2014) (pdf archive file) Eavesdropping bees encouraged by "whispers, deterred by "shouts".

Science Recorder (2014) (pdf archive file) Some bees 'shout' to warn would-be competitors.

Eastern Tribune (2014) (pdf archive file) Brazilian bees shout at competitors while pollinating.

American Bee Journal (2014) (pdf archive file) Why ‘whispers’ among bees sometimes evolve into ‘shouts’.

Science World Report (2014) (pdf archive file) Bees ‘shout’ instead of whisper to avoid eavesdroppers.

ScienceBlog (2014) (pdf archive file) Why ‘whispers’ among bees sometimes evolve into ‘shouts’.

Nature World News (2014) (pdf archive file) ‘Whispers’ among bees turn into ‘shouts’

American Live Wire (2014) (pdf archive file) The bee personality: some bees whisper, others shout!

PhysOrg (2014) (pdf archive file) Why ‘whispers’ among bees sometimes evolve into ‘shouts’.

RedOrbit (2014) (pdf archive file) Bee ‘shouts’ warn intruders that a food source will be defended.

Discovery News (2014) (pdf archive file) Some bees shout ‘That nectar’s ours!”

Examiner.com (2014) (pdf archive file) Researcher finds some bees evolved to shout at competitors.



Bray, A. and Nieh, J. C. (2014) PLoS ONE. Non-consumptive predator effects shape honey bee foraging and recruitment dancing. PLoS ONE. 9(1) e87459, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0087459.

New paper. Tan, K., Hu, Z., Chen, W., Wang, Z., Wang, Y., and Nieh, J. C. (2013) Fearful foragers: honey bees tune colony and individual foraging to multi-predator presence and food quality. PLOS ONE. 8(9) e75841, DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0075841.

The following news articles have been published in the media based upon Tan, K., Hu, Z., Chen, W., Wang, Z., Wang, Y., and Nieh, J. C. (2013)

NatureWorldNews.com (2013) (pdf archive file) Honey bees fear of hornets keeps them away from food sources.

Phys.org (2013) (pdf archive file) Fear of predators drives honey bees away from good food sources.

RedOrbit.com (2013) (pdf archive file) Honeybees avoid food near predatory hotspots.

ScienceDaily.com (2013) (pdf archive file) Fear of predators drives honeybees away from good food sources.

Environmental News Network (2013) (pdf archive file) Fear of predators drives honeybees away from good food sources.

New project.In the video below, you will see an example of the behavior of honey bee larvae recorded inside an incubator. If you look closely on the right side, you will see movements of the larvae, which have been sped up. We plan to use this setup to study the effects of Nosema ceranae infection on honey bee larval behavior and nurse bee behavior

Please note: The copyright of these articles (with the exception of Open Access articles) is with their respective publishers. By downloading an article, you agree to limit the use of the pdf file to printing of single copies for personal research and study. You may not modify the files in any way, or to use them for commercial purposes.

Lau, C. (2012) Ancient Chinese Apiculture. Bee World. December 2012.

Hagbery, J. and Nieh, J. C. (2012) Individual lifetime pollen and nectar foraging preferences in bumble bees. Naturwissenschaften. DOI 10.1007/s00114-012-0964-7. 99:821-832.

Goodale, E. and Nieh, J. C. (2012) Public use of olfactory information associated with predation in two species of social bees. Animal Behaviour. 84:919-924

Eckles, M. A., Roubik, D. W. and Nieh, J. C. (2012) A stingless bee can use visual odometry to estimate both height and distance. Journal of Experimental Biology. 215:3155-3160.

Nieh JC (2012) Animal Behavior: The orphan rebellion. Dispatch for Current Biology 22(8) R280-281

Wade Robinson J, Nieh JC, Goodale E (2012) Testing honey bee avoidance of predators: teaching the scientific process through an engaging field experiment. The American Biology Teacher. 74(7):452-457.

Contrera FAL, Couvillon MJ, Nieh JC (2012) Editorial: Hymenopteran collective foraging and information transfer about resources. Psyche, Article ID 273985, 2 pages, doi:10.1155/2012/273985

Eiri D, Nieh JC (2012) A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist affects honey bee sucrose responsiveness and decreases waggle dancing. Journal of Experimental Biology. 215:2022-2029.



Nguyen H, Nieh JC (2012) Colony and individual forager responses to food quality in the New World bumble bee, Bombus occidentalis. Journal of Insect Behavior. 25:60-69.

Wade Robinson J, Nieh JC, and Goodale E (2011) Pollinators in Peril: A High School Curriculum. Why are bee species disappearing? How can we save species and ourselves? How can we use science to better our world? In this 84 page document, the authors (a high school teacher at San Diego High Tech High, a UCSD faculty member, and a postdoctoral researcher) create a high school science curriculum that addresses three National Science Standards (Inquiry, Life Science, and Science in Personal and Social Perspectives). This single file contains the entire curriculum, including powerpoint presentations. The individual files are also available on Jesse Wade Robinson's website and on the Nieh lab's Teaching Bee website. This project was made possible by a Blasker Science and Technology grant from the San Diego Foundation and partially funded by the National Science Foundation.

Eben Goodale hosts High Tech High student honey bee presentations (November 2011) Together with High Tech High teacher Jesse Wade Robinson, Eben Goodale hosted a mini-conference where more than 40 high school students presented their research on honey bees. Please see the TeachingBee YouTube site. for detailed videos of the student presentations.

Meg Eckles receives a UCSD Excellence in Teaching Award (September 2011) Congratulations to PhD student, Meg Eckles, for receiving a TA Excellence in Teaching Award for her work as a teaching assistant in 2010-2011!

Welcome to visiting Fulbright Scholar, Dr. Guntima Suwannapong (September 2011) Thai professor, Dr. Suwannapong, received a prestigious Fulbright Scholar Award and is conducting research at the Nieh lab for six months on the function of honey bee mandibular gland secretions. This gland is thought to produce an alarm pheromone, but the effects of mandibular gland secretions remain unclear. Dr. Suwannapong has analyzed the chemical contents of honey bee mandibular glands and will be conducting a variety of experiments and bioassays to determine the function of this pheromone.

New research collaboration with Mexican scientists: Effects of the pesticide Spinosad on Mexican bees (August 2011) The title of the project is "Ecological risk assessment: exploring the compatability between the use of Spinosad in agriculture and social pollination by Mexican bees." The Nieh lab is pleased to collaborate with Dr. Daniel Sánchez, El Colegio de La Frontera Sur, Tapachula, Chiapas, Mexico. This project will allow an undergraduate or Masters student to travel and take part in this pesticide research in Mexico.

James Nieh receives 2011 San Diego Science Educator's Association Excellence in University Teaching Award Link to SDSEA website See also This Week@UCSD article by Kim McDonald.

New paper: Sanchez, Nieh, & Vandame (2011) Visual and chemical cues provide redundant information in the multimodal recruitment system of the stingless bee Scaptotrigona mexicana (Apidae, Meliponini). Insectes Sociaux: in press.


Video, Television, & Radio

Joyce, E. (2011) "Another pesticide link to vanishing honeybees" KPBS radio broadcast. Listen to the audio recording.

Joyce, E. (2010) "The mystery of vanishing honey bees" KPBS television. Viewable video.

Home and Garden Television, Gardening by the Yard (Episode GBY-1712H) "The Life Cycle of Bees" Season 19. Episode description and photo, but no video link.

Scientific American Frontiers (Calls of the Wild: Bee Lines) "The Life Cycle of Bees" In this early episode, Alan Alda speaks to James Nieh and David Roubik about the recruitment communication of one species of stingless bee in Panama. To view the video, please click on the "Bee Lines" link, the fourth segment in the episode entitled "Calls of the Wild." Viewable video.

Scientific American Frontiers (Calls of the Wild: Bee Lines) "The Life Cycle of Bees" In this early episode, Alan Alda speaks to James Nieh and David Roubik about the recruitment communication of a stingless bee in Panama. This is the link to the show transcript.

University of California Television (first aired 23 February 2009) "Life and death among the flowers" Viewable video.

KPBS Public Radio (21 January 2009) Interview with Maureen Cavanaugh. Listen to the audio recording.

University of California Television (first aired 25 February 2002) "Symbolic communication in stingless bees: exploring the third dimension" Viewable video.



Popular Press & Outreach Archive

Here, we list events, news articles, and public lectures that have occurred and which are related to research conducted in the Nieh lab. We wish to note that the most accurate interpretations of our published research are obtained from the published papers themselves. Statements and claims made in these news articles have not been verified by the paper authors.

Public lecture: (April 18, 2017) Nieh JC, Honey bee health: challenges and hope. Public science lecture for The Bishop’s School, La Jolla, California.

Public lecture: (April 5, 2017) Nieh JC, Honey bee health: food and hope. Torrey Pines Rotary Club, La Jolla, California.

Lab presentation: (Mar 10, 2017) Nieh JC, lab tour for Society of Undergraduate Research and Outreach (SURO) at UCSD for URM high school students and undergraduates. UCSD, La Jolla, California.

Public lecture: (Feb 28, 2017) Nieh JC, Honestly dangerous: Poison and alarm signals in highly social bees. Miramar Community College, San Diego, California.


Public lecture: (Feb 14, 2017) Nieh JC, Honey bees: health and food. Rotary Club, La Jolla, California.

Public lecture: (January 24, 2017) Nieh JC, Honesty is sometimes best: the evolution of alarm communication in bees. Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UCSD, La Jolla, California.

Public lecture: (November 28, 2016) Nieh JC, An elegant warning: encoding danger and context in the vibrational communication of Asian honey bees. San Diego State University, San Diego, California

Conference presentation (November 15, 2016) Nieh JC, Using immune priming to activate honey bee immunity against Nosema ceranae infection. California State Beekeepers Association Annual Convention 2016, San Diego, California.

Invited academic talk: (November 9, 2016) Nieh JC, University of British Columbia. Referential communication of danger by Asian honey bees.

Invited academic talk: (Oct 17, 2016) Nieh JC. University of Kentucky. Cries in the hive: encoding danger and context in the referential communication of Asian honey bees.

Conference presentation: (September 30, 2016) Nieh JC. International Congress of Entomology. Effects of a new pesticide, flupyradifurone (Sivanto), on honey bee sucrose response thresholds and orientation.

Conference presentation: (September 24, 2016) Nieh JC. IUSSI NAS Breakout Meeting. A honey bee inhibitory signal provides referential information about predator threat and can act as a colony alarm signal.

Public lecture: (July 11, 2016) Nieh, JC, Presentation: Honey bee health: What’s up with pesticides and bee diseases? San Diego Beekeeper’s Assocation, Balboa Park, Casa del Prado, Room 101.

Public lecture: (June 8, 2016) Nieh, JC, Presentation: Honey bee health: food, life, and love. University of San Diego, University of the Third Age, Community Outreach.

Public lecture: (May 14, 2016) Nieh, JC, Presentation: The conundrum of modern agriculture: pesticide effects on honey bees. No bees, no food campaign by Environment America.

Lecture: (Feb 25, 2016) Nieh, JC, Presentation on honey bee health and declines to the UCSD Pre-Veterinary Student Association.

Undergraduate Honors Seminar: (Fall 2015) Nieh JC, Healing honey bees: how basic research can translate into practical solutions. Muir College Honors Seminar, UCSD, La Jolla, California.

Public lecture: (Nov 17, 2015) Nieh JC, Activating honey bee immunity against Nosema ceranae infection. California State Beekeeper's Association, Sacramento, California.

Public lecture: (Nov 13, 2015) Nieh JC, Sublethal pesticide effects on honey bee behavior. Pennsylvania Beekeeper’s Annual Conference, Pennsylvania State Beekeepers’ Association, Lewisburg, Pennsylvania.

Public lecture: (June 19, 2015, exact date to be determined) Nieh JC, Honey bee health: diseases and pesticides. Seminar at the Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico (CICESE).

Public lecture: (May 14, 2015) Nieh JC. The effects of neonicotinoid pesticides on honey bee behavior. Seminar at El Colegio de la Frontera Sur, Tapachula, Chiapas, Mexico.

Public lecture: (April 24, 2015) Nieh JC, Shaped by danger: How honey bee foraging and communication respond to predators and are shaped by eavesdropping and inhibitory signaling. Joint BEACON and Entomology Seminar. Michigan State University, Michigan, USA.

Honey Bee Online Studies (HOBOS) for teaching (2015) The Nieh lab has now partnered with HOBOS to provide more teaching resources (available in English or German) that teach the scientific method and the importance of honey bees. HOBOS complements the Teaching Bee.

Teaching Bee Exercises and Videos (2015) Exercises and videos from the Teaching Bee are now available and permanently archived at the UCSD Library's digital collections. These items are designed to teach the scientific method and the importance of bees as pollinators. They are for students and teachers at multiple levels (elementary-college) and are also on the Teaching Bee website, but the UCSD library will provide a permanent archive that we also hope will attract more users.


Public lecture: (April 29, 2014) Nieh JC, The conundrum of honey bee health. Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UCSD, La Jolla, California.

New UCSD Freshman Seminar (Winter Quarter 2014) Nieh JC, "Saving the bees: the science behind bee declines and what you can do about it." Many species of bees, including honey bees, face declines due to multiple factors. We will learn the latest scientific research on these problems and design innovative ways to improve public awareness and deal with these issues. Students with the best practical ideas and inventions will be encouraged to implement them in subsequent quarters. Seminar for UCSD Freshman. UCSD, La Jolla, California, USA.

Public lecture: (Oct 1, 2013) Nieh JC, Risky business: effects of neonicotinoid pesticides on bee behavior. Orange County Beekeeper’s Association, Orange County, California.

Departmental seminar: (Sept 25, 2013) Nieh JC, Hazards of pollination: the honey bee dance language tells us about foraging dangers, natural and man-made. Seminar. Howard University, Washington DC, USA.

Panel discussion: (June 23, 2013) Tosi, Simone, Panelist for discussion on honey bees and bee health at Whole Foods Market, La Jolla, California

Public lecture: (June 22, 2013) Nieh JC, "Shaking up the hive: honey bees produce a special signal in response to danger." New Mexico Beekeeper’s Association Mid-Year Meeting, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Public lecture: (June 22, 2013) Nieh JC, "Challenges to honey bee health: effects of a neonicotinoid pesticide and Nosema ceranae infection. New Mexico Beekeeper’s Association Mid-Year Meeting, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Panel discussion: (May 31, 2013) Nieh JC, Panelist for discussion following movie screening of “More than Honey” by Markus Imhoof, by the Santa Barbara Beekeeping Association, Santa Barbara, California.

Public lecture: (May 23, 2013) Nieh JC, Effects of neonicotinoid pesticides on honey bees. Beekeepers Association of Southern California, La Mirada, California.

Public lecture: (May 7, 2013) Nieh JC, Effects of Nosema cerana infection on honey bee larvae. Orange County Beekeeper’s Association, Orange County, California.

Public lecture: (March 24, 2013) Nieh JC, Lecture and presentation on honey bee biology, diseases, and health as part of the UCSD Alumni Association and the San Diego Science and Engineering Fair at Wild Willow Farm and Education Center, San Diego, California.

Public lecture: "Risky business: effects of predators and pesticide on bee foraging communication" (May 6, 2013) Nieh JC, Seminar. University of California Santa Barbara.

Public lecture: "Silent Spring + 50: Lessons from San Diego’s Bees and Bays": The Silent Spring Series: Exploring Ethics." The research featured in this lecture is the work of Daren Eiri, whose Master's thesis was based upon the effects of Imidacloprid and who subsequently tested the hypothesis that Nosema ceranae can infect honey bees.

Public lecture: "What’s up with those bees? Honey bee declines and disease” (Jan 17, 2013) for the San Diego Science Educators Association, San Diego. Please contact SDSEA for more information.

Public lecture on honey bee health and the fungal pathogen, Nosema. (Nov 15, 2012) California State Beekeepers Association Convention, Palm Springs, California.

Lecture on bee eavesdropping and espionage. (Sept 26, 2012) CSU Fullerton for the Southern California Ecosystems Research Project.

Essential pollinators: learn about native bees and honey bees.” (June 23, 2012) Balboa Park, Casa Del Prado, San Diego, California for San Diego Pollinator Week.

The great bee die-off: a crisis of colony health and contamination (April 12, 2012), Rancho Santa Fe Garden Club, Rancho Santa Fe, California.

Welcome to the mysterious world of bees (February 27, 2012) International House at UCSD will be hosting a free event open to the public at which clips from the movie "Queen of the Sun" will be shown. James Nieh will be one of the speakers at this event, which will also include other speakers: a visiting Thai Fulbright Professor, Dr. Guntima Suwannapong, and the Vice President of the San Diego Beekeeping Society, Eric Robinson. There will also be a local honey tasting! This event is brought to you by IAG, Slow Food Urban San Diego, The San Diego Beekeeping Society, Slow Food UCSD, Garden of Eden Organics, and the SSC.

The following news articles have been published in the media based upon Eiri and Nieh (2012) and a UCSD press release issued for this paper. Statements and claims made in these news articles have not been verified by D. Eiri or J. Nieh.

Mongabay.com (2012) (pdf archive file) After damning research, France proposes banning pesticide linked to bee collapse.

NSF (2012) (pdf archive file) Crop pesticide's impact on honey bees (NSF news).

wired.com (2012) (pdf archive file) Pesticides make honeybees picky eaters and reluctant dancers (Wired UK).

MailOnline (2012) (pdf archive file) Pesticide kills bee colonies by turning insects into ‘picky eaters’ who crave sweeter nectar - and ignore nearby food.

redorbit.com (2012) (pdf archive file) Pesticide Turns Bees Into Picky Eaters - Science News.

sciencedaily.com (2012) (pdf archive file) Commonly used pesticide turns honey bees into ‘picky eaters'.

westernfarmpress.com (2012) (pdf archive file) Pesticide affects honey bee feeding habits.

beyondpesticides.org (2012) (pdf archive file) Beyond Pesticides Daily News Blog » Blog Archive » Research Shows Imidacloprid Depresses Honey Bee Feeding and Communication.

enewspf.com (2012) (pdf archive file) Research Shows Imidacloprid Depresses Honey Bee Feeding and Communication.

esciencenews.com (2012) (pdf archive file) Commonly used pesticide turns honey bees into ‘picky eaters’.

phys.org (2012) (pdf archive file) Commonly used pesticide turns honey bees into ‘picky eaters’.

wildlifenews.co.uk (2012) (pdf archive file) Common pesticide gives bees a sweet-tooth.

scientias.nl (2012) (pdf archive file) Bestrijdingsmiddel maakt honingbij tot een kieskeurige eter.

tech.money.pl (2012) (pdf archive file) Pestycyd sprawia, że pszczoły stają się wybredne.

tw.news.yahoo.com (2012) (pdf archive file) Pesticides make bees 'picky eaters' (Chinese language publication).

Pat Ledden Memorial Luncheon Talk (December 1, 2011) "Perils of pollination: warning cries inside the hive", Upcoming lecture. Location: Ida and Cecil Green Faculty Club, UCSD Campus, La Jolla, California, (time to be announced).

Idyllwild Garden Club Talk (October 22, 2011) "What's up with those bees?" Upcoming lecture. Location: Caine Learing Center, Idyllwild, California (9:00-10:00 am).

UCSD Emerti Association Talk (October 12, 2011) "Pollinators in peril: factors behind honey bee declines" Upcoming lecture. Location: Ida and Cecil Green Faculty Club, UCSD Campus, La Jolla, California (3:30-5:00 pm).

San Diego Master Gardener's Association (24 May 2011) " Pollinators in peril" Upcoming lecture. This is largely similar in content to the lecture that I gave on the 19 April 2011 (see below). Location: Balboa Park, Casa Del Prado, Room 101, 9-10 am.

Perspectives on Science, Point Loma Nazarene University (3 May 2011) "The secret lives of bees" Upcoming lecture. This lecture will focus on the biology and communication of bees, particularly honey bees and stingless bees. At the end, there will be a brief discussion of bee declines that is similar to the information provided in previous presentations I have given this year.

Lecture Reprise (29 April 2011). In case you missed the lecture that I gave earlier this week on the "Decline and Fall of Bees: Pollinators in Peril" (see below), I will also be giving it to an undergraduate student class at UCSD in Solis Hall Room Room 107 on 4/29/11 from noon to 1 pm. This is the same lecture. If you are not a UCSD student but would like to attend, please email the instructor (msaier@ucsd.edu) for permission.

UCSD Biomedical Library Talk (19 April 2011) "Decline and fall of bees: pollinators in peril" Listen to the audio recording and view the slides. As a clarification, I would like to add that although it is possible to find individuals to remove swarms for free, removal of colonies inside buildings requires qualified individuals and, depending upon the difficulty of the removal, will cost varying amounts. A good resource for San Diegans is provided by the San Diego Beekeeping Society. Here is a list of people who can help you out.

Food Justice Forum (16 April 2011) Food Justice Forum Cultivating University-Community Partnerships for a Healthier Society. See also: "Food Justice Forum a Success at The Global Arc.

Anonymous (2010) "Bees use a stop signal to warn nestmates of danger" BBC News Big Picture

Reilly, M. (2010) "Bees can say stop" Discovery News, Animal Planet

A. N. I. (2010) "Stop signal in honey bee communication discovered by biologist" Science News

Braun (2010) "Bees butt waggle dancers when danger lurks" National Geographic, NatGeo News Watch

LaFee (2010) "Hives stayin' alive: dancing bees' 'stop signal' warns of peril, UCSD researcher says" San Diego Union Tribune

UCSD (2010) " Biologist discovers ‘stop’ signal in honey bee communication"

Hadley, D. (2010) " Threatened honey bees tell others to 'Stop dancing!'" About.com: Insects

Soos, A. (2010) "The Language of Bees" Environmental News Network

Schoolcraft (2010) "Butting bees say 'stop'" Springfield Plateau

Anonymous (2009) " Warm Bee Food" The New York Times Science in Pictures

Anonymous (2009) "Hot for teacher" ScienceShots

Brown S (2008) "Wasps and Bumble Bees Heat Up, Fly Faster With Protein-Rich Food"

Phillips K (2008) "Pollen makes bees hot" (with cartoon!) The Journal of Experimental Biology 2008: iii

Walsh P (2006-2007) " ORBS Receives Funding from NSF" BioSphere 2006-2007: 26

Walsh P (2005) " UCSD Biological Sciences: hooking kids (and grownups) on science" BioSphere Fall: 26

Rowe P (2005) " How do you get from point A to point Bee?" San Diego Union-Tribune 17 July: E2

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